Monday, November 16, 2015

Publishers Weekly Picks Best Children's Books 2015


Take a look at Publishers Weekly (PW) editors' choices of 2015 best books to discover outstanding new titles. The lists include picture books, middle-grade, and young adult books.

The picture books range from well-known authors such as Drew Daywalt (The Day The Crayons Came Home), Dave Eggers (This Bridge Will Not Be Gray) and Mordicai Gerstein (The Night World) to debut authors such as Guojing (The Only Child), who writes about growing up under China's one-child policy.

Middle-grade books include bestselling author Jodi Lynn Anderson (My Diary from the Edge of the World) and the amazing Brian Selznick (The Marvels).

Young adult titles range from a nonfiction title by M. T. Anderson (Symphony for the City of the Dead: Dmitri Shostakovich and the Siege of Leningrad) to Chicago-area writer Laura Ruby's new novel (Bone Gap). 

For more information visit PW or click on any of the above links.

The Night WorldThe MarvelsThe Only Child

Friday, September 4, 2015

Books Your Kids Will Love: Discover the Most Awaited Children's and YA Books for Fall 2015


 Even if your kids love to read their favorite books over and over, it's almost fall and time to discover some wonderful new titles. Publishers Weekly's choices for most anticipated children's and young adult (YA) books for fall highlight many good reads you and your kids are certain to enjoy.Their picks include new books from the beloved children's authors Dave Kinney, Audrey and Don Wood, Philip and Erin Stead, and Katherine Applegate, to name a few.

I'm looking forward to these new books that they've highlighted:



 Here's What PW Says:

The Day the Crayons Came Home by Drew Daywalt, illus. by Oliver Jeffers (Philomel, Aug.) - Daywalt and Jeffers’s The Day the Crayons Quit has been a stalwart on bestseller lists since it was published in 2013. This very funny follow-up sees the crayons writing postcards to their young owner after being left out of town on vacation, lost within the sofa, or otherwise abused.

The Full Moon at the Napping House by Audrey Wood and Don Wood (HMH, Sept.) - More than 30 years after the publication of bedtime favorite The Napping House, this husband-and-wife team takes readers back to a dwelling, where a certain granny, boy, dog, and cat are having trouble falling asleep under the light of an enormous moon.

Lenny and Lucy by Philip C. Stead and Erin E. Stead (Roaring Brook/Porter, Oct.) - The Steads made a name for themselves with the Caldecott Medal–winning A Sick Day for Amos McGee and have been accumulating accolades ever since. Their latest tells of a boy who creates a pair of protector-companions as he adjusts to his new home.

Leo: A Ghost Story by Mac Barnett, illus. by Christian Robinson (Chronicle, Aug.) - Who says ghosts don’t have feelings? Not Barnett and Robinson, whose “ghost story” is alternately funny, sad, and sweet as a lonesome spirit named Leo tries to make a connection that doesn’t leave the other party fleeing in terror.

Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate (Feiwel and Friends, Sept.) - Applegate is back with her first middle-grade novel since The One and Only Ivan, which won the 2013 Newbery Medal. In this equally sensitive story, fifth-grader Jackson worries that the reappearance of his childhood imaginary friend portends the return of problems for his family, too.

Visit PW for more listings.  Happy reading!

What are your picks for the most exciting children's books coming this fall? Please share your choices below.

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Thursday, July 30, 2015

Funny Tweets on What NOT To Say To A Writer

Entertainment Weekly has gathered some wacky and wild tweets from writers on the maddening things people say to them about writing. Joanne Harris, author of Chocolat, kicked off the trend when her hashtag #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter caused a hilarious uproar on literary Twitterverse, July 28, 2015, with other writers following up with their own funny and awful things they've been told.

A couple of highlights from the Entertainment Weekly article:

S.E. Hinton
I thought you were dead. #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter

Harlen Coben
Eye surgeon: I'm thinking of writing a novel!
Me: Cool, I'm thinking of doing eye surgery!
#TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter

A couple of funny and sad tweets from famous writers:

Amy Tan
#TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter CUSTOMER HANDING ME 5 BOOKS TO SIGN. "It was great. I got all of them for a dollar! No one else wanted them."

Jodi Picoult
I liked the movie version so much more.  #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter

I've been having fun adding my own #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter tweets:

"You really write poetry? Really? No kidding! Does it rhyme?" #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter

"Hey, wasn't your short story about the hermaphrodite nun who longed to sing in The Sound of Music really about you?" #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter

"It would be so far out to write a novel about Pluto with you."  #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter

"You write poetry? Hey, you should read Dr. Seuss." #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter

"You still haven't written that novel about the mating habits of orangutans I told you to write?"  #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter

"Why don't you just write a book like Harry Potter? How hard could it be!" #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter

"Why don't you get a real job?"  #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter

Feel free to share your own humorous #TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter both on Twitter and in my comments section below.


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Friday, July 10, 2015

The Pros and Cons of Paying to Enter Literary Contests


The Blunt instrumentWriters often shell out lots of money to enter literary contests and submit to magazines, but is it worth the expense? The Blunt Instrument has a very helpful article by Elisa Gabbert on how writers can make the decision whether or not to spend the $25 or more that contests often cost. It also clues writers in on what their options are if they choose to not bother with contests. Stop by Electric Lit to read the article and learn more.